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Terrain: Ideas and Inspiration for Decorating the Home and Garden


Price: $21.55
(as of May 11,2021 15:37:11 UTC – Details)


Named one of the Wall Street Journal’s Best Interior-Design Books to Give as Holiday Presents

Founded in a historic nursery in southeast Pennsylvania, Terrain is a nationally renowned garden, home, and lifestyle brand with an entirely fresh approach to living with nature. It’s an approach that bridges the gap between home and garden, the indoors and the outdoors. An approach that embraces decorating with plants and inviting the garden into every living space.

Terrain, the book, not only captures the brand’s unique and lushly appealing sensibility in over 450 beautiful photographs but also shows, in project after project, tip after tip, how to live with nature at home. Here are ideas for flower arranging beyond the expected bouquet, using branches and wild blooms, seed heads and bulbs. Ten colorful container gardens inspired by painterly palettes. Dozens of ideas for making wreaths out of vines, dried stems, evergreens, and fresh leaves and fern fronds (which you learn to preserve in glycerin). Here are secrets for forcing branches to bloom in the middle of winter. Decorating with heirloom pumpkins, including turning them into tabletop planters. Simple touches—like massing high-summer hydrangeas into weathered baskets and scattering them around the patio—and more involved projects, including taking inspiration from Scandinavia and Britain to create a truly natural Christmas.

With inspiration for every season, Terrain blurs the indoors and out to bring the subtle and surprising joys of nature into our lives every day.


From the Publisher

planted pumpkinsplanted pumpkins

Featuring dozens of projects for every season:

Planted Pumpkins.

project 2project 2

Featuring dozens of projects for every season:

Living Holiday Gifts.

planterplanter

Featuring dozens of projects for every season:

A Spring Bulb Planting.

centerpiececenterpiece

Featuring dozens of projects for every season:

A Dramatic Summer Centerpiece.

planted pumpkinsplanted pumpkins

Planted Pumpkins

project 2project 2

Living Holiday Gifts

planterplanter

A Spring Bulb Planting

centerpiececenterpiece

A Dramatic Summer Centerpiece

Explore Terrain’s planting philosophy:

chives

chives

tree

tree

branch

branch

Contrast High-Low Style

A successful container garden often begins with the meeting of opposites, using disparate elements to create a high-low effect. The juxtaposition of textures is central to many high-low displays; The formal shape of a rusted wire urn finds equilibrium in a humble planting of overgrown chives (Allium schoenoprasum).

Celebrate Wild & Imperfect Forms

While well-manicured specimens in sleek vessels have a tidy appeal, a less polished planting showcases the unpredictable beauty of the natural world. A planter that celebrates imperfection—from overgrown stems to weathered materials—embraces the ever-changing nature of the garden itself.

Find Beauty in Your Backyard

When seeking an impactful accent for a planted vessel, head into the wild. Worn by the elements, branches are particularly well suited to container plantings, where they can serve as organic sculptures, yielding unexpected riches of structure, texture, and color. Their striking size and untamed forms enliven even the simplest plantings, ramping up scale, adding drama, and serving as the focal point for a planter.

An in-depth look at wreath-making ingredients:

fresh

fresh

dried

dried

faux

faux

fern

fern

Fresh Foliage

When making a fresh wreath, consider botanicals that have a long vase life, or those that dry gracefully for extended display. Good options include spring-budding or -flowering branches; mosses; summer vines like bittersweet and sturdy flowers like yarrow, strawflower, and grass plumes; fall foliage branches, nuts, and gourds; and winter greens, pods, and seed heads. Fresh wreaths are ideal for outdoor use, particularly during the colder months; they benefit from natural rainfall, and will last longer when not exposed to artificial heating.

Dried Stems

Perhaps the most familiar wreath-making materials, dried flowers and foliage offer the look of fresh stems with months—or even years—of added longevity. These materials extend the beauty of the garden, preserving what was most attractive in the spring and summer landscape for enjoyment year-round. Delicate dried stems are best suited to indoor or sheltered outdoor display; their fragile petals and leaves can’t withstand the wind and moisture of exposed outdoor locations.

Faux & Metal

For an everlasting accent indoors and out, consider a wreath made of faux stems or metal botanicals. Mimicking the look of natural components, these enduring materials can make permanent displays on their own or serve as the base for a rotating cast of more delicate fresh and dried stems.

Preserved Botanicals

Preserved flowers and foliage offer exceptionally lifelike color and flexibility for wreaths. The preserving process replaces the water content of a fresh stem with a glycerin solution; this maintains the original color and texture more effectively than drying, which can cause some leaves and petals to fade and become brittle.

branch 1branch 1

Learn to force spring branches:

‘Forcing’ is a way to trick branches into producing early blooms or leaves, even though wintry weather persists outside. Many spring-flowering trees and shrubs form their buds in autumn; after at least two months of temperatures below 40°F, they can be forced into bloom, if given the right preparation. In most regions, branches should not be cut before January 1 in a year of typical cold, or January 15 if the weather has been especially mild.

branch 3branch 3

Learn to force spring branches:

‘Forcing’ is a way to trick branches into producing early blooms or leaves, even though wintry weather persists outside. Many spring-flowering trees and shrubs form their buds in autumn; after at least two months of temperatures below 40°F, they can be forced into bloom, if given the right preparation. In most regions, branches should not be cut before January 1 in a year of typical cold, or January 15 if the weather has been especially mild.

branch 2branch 2

Learn to force spring branches:

‘Forcing’ is a way to trick branches into producing early blooms or leaves, even though wintry weather persists outside. Many spring-flowering trees and shrubs form their buds in autumn; after at least two months of temperatures below 40°F, they can be forced into bloom, if given the right preparation. In most regions, branches should not be cut before January 1 in a year of typical cold, or January 15 if the weather has been especially mild.

branch 4branch 4

Learn to force spring branches:

‘Forcing’ is a way to trick branches into producing early blooms or leaves, even though wintry weather persists outside. Many spring-flowering trees and shrubs form their buds in autumn; after at least two months of temperatures below 40°F, they can be forced into bloom, if given the right preparation. In most regions, branches should not be cut before January 1 in a year of typical cold, or January 15 if the weather has been especially mild.

branch 1branch 1

Tulip magnolia

branch 3branch 3

Japanese maple

branch 2branch 2

Eastern black walnut

branch 4branch 4

Dappled willow

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